Home » 19th-Century African-American Activists: Ida B. Wells, Mary Burnett Talbert, Edmonson Sisters, Homer Plessy, Norris Wright Cuney by Source Wikipedia
19th-Century African-American Activists: Ida B. Wells, Mary Burnett Talbert, Edmonson Sisters, Homer Plessy, Norris Wright Cuney Source Wikipedia

19th-Century African-American Activists: Ida B. Wells, Mary Burnett Talbert, Edmonson Sisters, Homer Plessy, Norris Wright Cuney

Source Wikipedia

Published August 19th 2011
ISBN : 9781233099061
Paperback
36 pages
Enter the sum

 About the Book 

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 34. Chapters: Ida B. Wells, Mary Burnett Talbert, Edmonson sisters, Homer Plessy, Norris Wright Cuney, ThomasMorePlease note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 34. Chapters: Ida B. Wells, Mary Burnett Talbert, Edmonson sisters, Homer Plessy, Norris Wright Cuney, Thomas Dalton and Lucy Lew, Lucy Parsons, William Cooper Nell, Benjamin Pap Singleton, Samuel Ringgold Ward, Henry Highland Garnet, Robert Purvis, Elizabeth Jennings Graham, Sarah J. Garnet, James R. Newby, Stephen H. Gloucester, John Teasman, Robert Fox, Jermain Wesley Loguen, Kate Brown, Samuel R. Scottron, Sallie Robinson, James W.C. Pennington, Austin Steward. Excerpt: Ida Bell Wells-Barnett (July 16, 1862 - March 25, 1931) was an African American journalist, newspaper editor and, with her husband, newspaper owner Ferdinand L. Barnett, an early leader in the civil rights movement. She documented lynching in the United States, showing how it was often a way to control or punish blacks who competed with whites. She was active in the womens rights and the womens suffrage movement, establishing several notable womens organizations. In addition to her skills as a rhetorician, Wells was a persuasive speaker, and traveled internationally on lecture tours. Ida B. Wells was born in Holly Springs, Mississippi in 1862, just before President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation. Her father James Wells was a carpenter and her mother was Elizabeth Lizzie Warrenton Wells. Both parents were enslaved until freed under the Proclamation, one year after Ida was born. Idas father James was a master at carpentry and known as a race man, someone who worked for the advancement of blacks. He was very interested in politics, and was a member of the Loyal League. He attended public speeches and campaigned for local black candidates, but he never ran for office. Her mother Elizabeth was a cook for the Bolling household before her death from yellow fever. She was a religious woman who was very strict with her children. Wells p...